Tips for Growing Boxwoods in Containers

Evergreen boxwoods grow equally well in-ground or in containers, making boxwoods a delightful evergreen plant to grow as a stand alone container plant or as part of a larger container garden.

Tips for Growing Boxwoods in Containers xwoods grow equally well in-ground or in containers, making boxwoods a delightful evergreen plant to grow as a stand alone container plant or as part of a larger container garden. Boxwoods are one of the few garden plants that looks as well in January as it does in June, and the evergreen takes on a garden sculpture look when it's planted in a container. Here are some tips for successfully growing boxwoods in containers.

Choose the Right Planting Container

Choose fast draining containers that are at least as wide and tall as the evergreen plant being planted in it. Bigger is better when choosing container for boxwoods. The bigger the planting container, the more soil it will hold and the less often the boxwood will need watering or repotting.

Potting Soil for Boxwoods

Use potting soil formulated specifically for planting trees and shrubs to fill the planting containers. Garden soil is too heavy for container grown boxwoods. Fill the container around the boxwood root ball and up to one-half inch below the rim of the planting container. This shallow indentation in the soil will prevent water from spilling out of the container.

Hand Water Boxwoods

Container grown boxwoods do best when they are hand watered, which ensures each evergreen shrub gets a thorough watering. Hand water each boxwood from the top of soil until water runs out the bottom drainage hole. Then repeat the watering just to make sure the potting soil is moist from top to bottom. Boxwoods need this deep hand watering once per week during summer (when it doesn't rain) even though they are drought tolerant. The rest of the year container grown boxwoods will rarely ever need watering.

Feed Container Grown Boxwoods Compost

Container grown boxwoods really don't require a yearly feeding of fertilize, but the evergreens will benefit from a dose of compost. As container boxwoods are watered, some of the potting soil leaches out, so to replace the missing soil and feed boxwoods, add about one inch of compost to the top of the soil each year. The compost refills the container and feeds the boxwood each time it's watered.

Boxwoods are low Maintenance

Boxwoods grow very slowly, so they rarely need trimming or repotting. Plant several boxwoods in containers and use to line a walkway or driveway. Just one boxwood planted in a large container makes quite a visual impact as a garden center piece or backdrop.

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